sams-film-stills:

Reservoir Dogs (1992) Dir. Quentin Tarantino 

sams-film-stills:

The Cabin In The Woods (2012) Dir. Drew Goddard

sams-film-stills:

Jarhead (2005) Dir. Sam Mendes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

Sir, do you realize you’re not drinking regular coffee, but Colombian Decaffeinated Coffee Crystals? -

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